Vegan Salt –the blog











{November 26, 2010}   Our Vegan Thanksgiving

-or- What The Vegans Ate.

I come from a big, omnivorous family.  I love them all dearly, but last year, around the time I started blogging, I resolved that I would never again put myself through a Thanksgiving celebration at which a bird’s carcass was on the dinner table.  I am an adult, and I refuse to be expected to accept as okay something (namely; the violence, slavery and death of a being whose body is then picked apart) which is not at all okay, as one of my favorite bloggers recently articulated.  As a result of this decision, I may never celebrate with the entire family again.  But the vegan story ends happily, and with full bellies!

This year, my vegan brother invited us over to a feast at his home, and the meal was so fantastic that I have to share these photos.  His boyfriend roasted a Tofurkey (yes, I know, it sounds funny, Read the rest of this entry »

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{November 13, 2010}   Vegan Thanksgiving is Tonight!!

Ching Sanctuary has been holding a vegan thanksgiving dinner in Salt Lake City every year for at least as long as I’ve been vegan.  This year, I’ll be attending  for the first time!  Vegan Thanksgiving has attained mythic status in certain circles.  People talk about the food for weeks beforehand with longing sighs, and for weeks afterward with fond, dreamy remembrance.

I went to a volunteer meeting this year (I was going to bake the pies this year, but Cakewalk took over the desserts….and if I know Kelly, the whole event will only be that much better for it.)   Anyhow, I can safely say that dozens of people devote hours, days, or weeks to making this event a success, both as a fundraiser for a wonderful rescued animal shelter, and as a community celebration.

Thanksgiving is a time of year when many of us struggle to reconcile our love for friends and family who still eat turkeys with our repulsion at having a murdered turkey on the table.  No wonder Vegan Thanksgiving has been so popular, with over 300 guests last year!  Vegans love to celebrate holidays, and it’s so much more joyful when you know nobody was hurt for your feast.

You don’t have to be vegan to come and enjoy a fantastic meal, and the money all goes to a very worthy cause. Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary takes in rescued cows, pigs, goats, birds, sheep, and other “farm” animals.  They rehabilitate injured animals and open their doors to the community for tours, so people can visit with the animals and learn to appreciate and understand them as individuals who have, in many cases, overcome miserable and traumatic circumstances.   Get $1 off for every blanket you donate for the pigs.

I’ll see you tonight!!



{November 1, 2010}   Happy November, Vegans!

Today, November 1st, is World Vegan Day, a day to celebrate your nonviolent lifestyle and to spread the word to others who aren’t yet vegan.  (I like to think of non-vegans as not-yet-vegans who will get there with a little encouragement, a shopping buddy, and a plate of vegan cookies, fresh from the oven.)

I’ve been vegan for four and a half years now, and I’m still discovering new reasons to celebrate.  My new-found vegan joys include:

  • coconut milk yogurt
  • a vegan “uncheese” cookbook on sale for $7
  • kombucha!! (bottled, flavored, fermented fungus-based tea, crammed with nutrients and only slightly alcoholic)
  • a place to buy cruelty-free mascara within blocks of my house

Okay, I found three of those things at the nearby Whole Foods, but even if there isn’t a health food grocery store in your neighborhood, you can enjoy my fifth vegan discovery: Vegan MoFo! That stands for Vegan Month of Food, and it kicks off today!

Whether it’s the result of the challenge involved, or the clean conscience, I’ve found that nobody loves food like vegans love food.  (If you doubt that, search Twitter for the hashtag #whatveganseat.)  Anyway, starting today, and going all month long, vegan bloggers will be sharing their food travel diaries, odes to slow cookers, glorious photos of their dinners, and vegan recipes for everything under the sun.  Those who have signed up for the challenge will attempt to post five times a week, for 20 total posts per participant.  And get this: there are over five hundred participating bloggers. Cheers to all my blogging friends who are taking on this challenge!  May your food photograph well, and may your oven never burn your masterpiece.  (No, I won’t be participating this year, but I will be reading the blogs and finding great food inspiration.  Maybe next year I’ll jump in.)

So, here’s to November!  There’s no excuse for being in a breakfast rut, or for putting off your transition to a vegan diet any longer, if you’ve been fence-sitting.  In answer to the persistent question, “What do vegans eat?”, there will soon be about 10,000 new answers online.  Of course, this raises another question: How much can your kitchen (and the stomachs of your family and friends) handle?

Follow VeganMoFo on Twitter, check out their homepage, or go back to where it all began, the Post Punk Kitchen, to start cooking.

Oh, and on more thing:

Perhaps not coincidentally, WordPress just launched FoodPress.com today, a site which compiles the best of the WordPress food blogs into one place.  Something tells me that VeganMoFo bloggers are going to make a strong showing.  Good luck to everyone, and Bon Appetit!



{August 27, 2010}   Vegan Grocery Bills -Part 1

Is it expensive to eat a vegan diet? There are a lot of pricey vegan specialty foods that could lead you to think so.  Countless hours of research and development have lead to vegan versions of many meat-and-dairy staples.  I’ve tried nearly all of the items below, and I’m quite fond of some of them.  But with very rare exceptions, vegan alternatives to meat, dairy, and other animal-derived products cost significantly more than the items they are replacing.

Of course, there’s a good reason for the disparity in price.  Government subsidies (yep, that’s our tax money) keep the price of animal products artificially low.  In other words, animal farmers and their suppliers are on welfare!  (They have to be, because they’re running an unsustainable industry.  People simply wouldn’t buy much meat or dairy if they had to pay the true cost for it, and factory farms would rapidly start going out of business.)  The makers of these vegan products are not subsidized, so what seems like a high price, is really just a fair price.  Now for some vegan munchies. This is just a tiny sampling of the many incredible animal-free foods now on the market!! Read the rest of this entry »



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